Extending the Usable Bandwidth of Seismic Data

SIG-First-Break_JAN16

 

Published in the January 2016 issue of EAGE’s First Break magazine, NEOS’ Seismic Imaging Group (SIG) discusses a frequency-dependent filtering technique that can significantly increase the available bandwidth of the seismic data. Click here or on the image above for the full article.

For more information on SIG, click here.

Holiday Reading List: Abundance

I ran across a great book recently, written by a couple of really interesting guys.  One – Peter Diamandis – is an MIT rocket scientist, Harvard-trained physician, satellite entreprenneur, and founder of the X Prize Foundation (which provides grants to fund private, passenger-carrying spaceships).  The second is Steven Kotler, a prolific author and Forbes blogger on topics that frequently deal with the intersection of science and culture.

The premise of Abundance is that the future will be fundamentally better (or that any future state we imagine will materialize sooner) than any of us can imagine due to the convergence of exponentially improving technologies in food production, genomics, nanomaterials, computing, robotics, etc.

It’s an exceptionally well written and approachable book that made me feel like I was sitting in the study, with a fire crackling in the fireplace and a cognac in hand, while a group of the world’s greatest visionary thinkers (be they venture capitalists, futurists or high-tech entreprenneurs) shared their views on the great advances they were anticipating for humanity.

Abundance was a #1 Amazon and #2 New York Times best seller.  Buy it for your loved one(s) or yourself this holiday season.

Overview of NEOS’s Seismic Imaging Group (SIG)

SIG101Mark Wallace, Technical Marketing Geophysicist in NEOS’s Seismic Imaging Group (SIG), provides an overview of the group’s experience, technology differentiators and focus areas in a 7-minute narrated slideshow.

Click here (or on the image above) to view the presentation.

Note that Dr. Edward Jenner, Research Director for SIG, will be reprising his SEG Lunch & Learn presentation via Webinar on Tuesday December 9.  Ed will be speaking about SIG’s latest technological innovation – structurally oriented frequency enhancement (SOFE), a technique to use mid-range acoustic signal to boost low- and high-end frequency content, ultimately improving seismic image resolution and the utility of the resulting seismic data for thin-bed or stacked-pay reservoir characterization and seismic inversion.

Analyst Sees $130 Oil in 2017

Interesting prediction, somewhat against the currently prevailing conventional wisdom. Lays out the rationale behind his ‘call’ and which market sectors to bet on if he’s right.

Focus on the Middle East – NEOS at the SEG 2015

Lebanon_hyperspectral_NEOSExploration interest in the eastern Mediterranean region has increased substantially in the last several years, driven in part by the very large gas discoveries made by several E&P operators offshore. Geoscientists are curious about the broader, regional implications of these offshore discoveries, as well as understanding how Syrian onshore petroleum systems extend into Lebanon.

NEOS conducted a geophysical airborne survey designed to map the regional prospectivity of 6,000 square kilometers, including the onshore northern half of the country and the transition zone along the Mediterranean coastline, by integrating legacy well and seismic data with newly acquired airborne geophysical datasets.

Mark your calendar and plan to attend:
Triassic hydrocarbon potential in the Eastern Mediterranean
Sole Velasco – Senior Geoscientist / Project Manager
Tuesday, October 20th | 2:20 pm
Special Global Session: Focus on the Middle East  |  Room 222

For more information about the Lebanon program, click here.

NEOS’ SIG Launches Frequency Enhancement Offering

Time slice of Mid-Continent USA data near the reservoir interval. Yellow highlights an interpreted graben feature. Data courtesy of ION GeoVentures.

Time slice of Mid-Continent USA data near the reservoir interval. Yellow highlights an interpreted graben feature. Data courtesy of ION GeoVentures.

The Seismic Imaging Group (SIG) at NEOS has launched a new seismic data processing offering.  This technique for structurally oriented frequency enhancement (SOFE) significantly improves the recovery of high and low frequency acoustic signal. The result is an improvement in the vertical resolution of seismic images and an increase in the quality and utility of the seismic data that geoscientists use for attribute extraction, inversions, and rock and fluid property determination.

According to Dr. Edward Jenner, Research Director at SIG,

SOFE works by applying a frequency-dependent filtering technique that uses the mid-range spectrum, in which we have the highest signal-to-noise, to guide the filtering and attenuation of noise in the low- and high-range frequency spectra, in which we have the lowest signal-to-noise.  The technique typically results in a significant increase in useable bandwidth of 30-50 Hz at the high-end of the spectrum, thus significantly increasing the resolution of the resulting seismic images.”

While SOFE will be of great value in almost every geologic setting, the greatest uplift will likely be realized by interpreters working in thin, stacked-pay reservoirs (such as those found in the Permian Basin) or those trying to image and determine rock properties in stratigraphic plays.

For those who will be at SEG in New Orleans next week, Dr. Jenner will be hosting an invitation-only Lunch & Learn on Tuesday October 20th.  If you’re interested in attending, please send an email to marketing@neosgeo.com or register by clicking here.

Data before and after SOFE. a) input seismic section; b) seismic section after SOFE; c) input seismic section after spectral balance - note significant high-frequency artifacts; d) SOFE section after the same spectral balance as in (c) – note high-frequency artifacts are eliminated and the result is a broad-band, high-resolution, interpretable section that ties the well data. Data courtesy of ION GeoVentures.

Data before and after SOFE. a) input seismic section; b) seismic section after SOFE; c) input seismic section after spectral balance – note significant high-frequency artifacts; d) SOFE section after the same spectral balance as in (c) – note high-frequency artifacts are eliminated and the result is a broad-band, high-resolution, interpretable section that ties the well data.
Data courtesy of ION GeoVentures.

To learn more about NEOS’ Seismic Imaging Group, click here.

NEOS Magazine: In The Zone, Issue #3

ITZ_blog postA new volume of the NEOS Company Magazine – In The Zone – is now available.  Click here to access a digital copy.  Hard copies will be available in the coming weeks.  To request your own copy, please email Lydia Jordan at ljordan@neosgeo.com.

Featured in this issue is the announcement of our Seismic Imaging Group, as well as how we are maximizing legacy G&G investments in the current downtown.  Furthermore, we explore how statistical pattern recognition techniques (aka predictive analytics) are unlocking insights among multiple geo-datasets.

When Geos Hit the Road: Petra

Petra1CMOh and our Senior Exploration Project Director had the good fortune to be in Jordan this weekend as part of a business development swing through the greater Mediterranean and Levant region.  The Sunday downtime destination? Petra – a UNESCO World Heritage site, one of the New Seven Wonders of the World, and one of Smithsonian Magazine’s ’28 Places to See Before You Die.’

The visit lived up to the accolades.  Of all the places I’ve been in my life, I’d have to say this was the most spectacular. The visit was borderline spiritual and other-worldly.

Petra was the capital city of the Nabataeans, an Arabic people who inhabited northern Arabia and the Levant. They were the premier traders of their time, controlling the major trade routes between Greece and Rome to the west and present-day Yemen, Oman and India to the east. They amassed incredible wealth and used some of it to create the most epic capital city in the world at that time.

The carved ancient city is entered through a Siq, a 1-mile long narrow fissure in the sandstone rocks caused by the erosive forces of episodic flooding. The Siq – and most of the rocks in which the carvings are made – belong to the Umm Ishrin formation, an Upper Cambrian (500 million years ago) massive weathered sandstone that was deposited in a fluvial (braided stream) environment. Evidence of aeolian (sand dune) deposition also exists. The multiple colors of the massive sandstone (yellow, grey, red, brown and mauve) give Petra – and especially the Siq – an amazing and ever-changing color palette as the day progresses and the angle of the sun evolves.

I agree with the Smithsonian – get there if you can!

Petra3PetraPostSiq2PetraSiq5

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Quantifying the Value of Information – Neuquen Development

VOI-OilVoice

Click here to continue reading this article on the Value of Information that we co-authored with Palantir and which was published in OilVoice on the 1st of September. Palantir used their economic modeling and asset optimization software to determine the economics of Vaca Muerta shale development under four different scenarios, in which the quantity and quality of subsurface G&G informaton varied.

The conclusion: investing $1,000 per sqkm to acquire and interpret multi-physics data in an attempt to highgrade acreage and identify sweet spots has a 10x ROI and roughly doubles the resource additions from the 30 well program.

An Emerging Hydrocarbon Province – Lebanon (Part 6 of 6)

LBN NarratedSlideshowA 13-minute narrated slideshow describing some of the exciting findings about the oil & gas exploration potential of Lebanon is accessible by clicking here or on the image above.

Click here to learn more about the Lebanon neoBASIN project on the Global Programs page of the NEOS web site.

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