NEOS’ SIG Launches Frequency Enhancement Offering

Time slice of Mid-Continent USA data near the reservoir interval. Yellow highlights an interpreted graben feature. Data courtesy of ION GeoVentures.
Time slice of Mid-Continent USA data near the reservoir interval. Yellow highlights an interpreted graben feature. Data courtesy of ION GeoVentures.

The Seismic Imaging Group (SIG) at NEOS has launched a new seismic data processing offering.  This technique for structurally oriented frequency enhancement (SOFE) significantly improves the recovery of high and low frequency acoustic signal. The result is an improvement in the vertical resolution of seismic images and an increase in the quality and utility of the seismic data that geoscientists use for attribute extraction, inversions, and rock and fluid property determination.

According to Dr. Edward Jenner, Research Director at SIG,

SOFE works by applying a frequency-dependent filtering technique that uses the mid-range spectrum, in which we have the highest signal-to-noise, to guide the filtering and attenuation of noise in the low- and high-range frequency spectra, in which we have the lowest signal-to-noise.  The technique typically results in a significant increase in useable bandwidth of 30-50 Hz at the high-end of the spectrum, thus significantly increasing the resolution of the resulting seismic images.”

While SOFE will be of great value in almost every geologic setting, the greatest uplift will likely be realized by interpreters working in thin, stacked-pay reservoirs (such as those found in the Permian Basin) or those trying to image and determine rock properties in stratigraphic plays.

For those who will be at SEG in New Orleans next week, Dr. Jenner will be hosting an invitation-only Lunch & Learn on Tuesday October 20th.  If you’re interested in attending, please send an email to [email protected] or register by clicking here.

Data before and after SOFE. a) input seismic section; b) seismic section after SOFE; c) input seismic section after spectral balance - note significant high-frequency artifacts; d) SOFE section after the same spectral balance as in (c) – note high-frequency artifacts are eliminated and the result is a broad-band, high-resolution, interpretable section that ties the well data. Data courtesy of ION GeoVentures.
Data before and after SOFE. a) input seismic section; b) seismic section after SOFE; c) input seismic section after spectral balance – note significant high-frequency artifacts; d) SOFE section after the same spectral balance as in (c) – note high-frequency artifacts are eliminated and the result is a broad-band, high-resolution, interpretable section that ties the well data.
Data courtesy of ION GeoVentures.

To learn more about NEOS’ Seismic Imaging Group, click here.

Quantifying the Value of Information – Neuquen Development

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Click here to continue reading this article on the Value of Information that we co-authored with Palantir and which was published in OilVoice on the 1st of September. Palantir used their economic modeling and asset optimization software to determine the economics of Vaca Muerta shale development under four different scenarios, in which the quantity and quality of subsurface G&G informaton varied.

The conclusion: investing $1,000 per sqkm to acquire and interpret multi-physics data in an attempt to highgrade acreage and identify sweet spots has a 10x ROI and roughly doubles the resource additions from the 30 well program.

NEOS Buys Onshore Seismic Data Processing Business

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I’m not sure if you’ve seen it yet, but NEOS just announced our acquisition of the onshore seismic data processing business of ION Geophysical’s GX Technology group.

Click here to read the press release.

This transaction involves a group of about 25 Denver-based folks who originally started as AXIS Geophysics and which ION acquired back in 2002.  This team commercialized the technologies and workflows for anisotropic and azimuthal processing, which ultimately found great utility in fracture detection and sweet spot imaging for hard-rock and unconventional source-rock reservoirs.

More recently, the Denver office has incorporated many of GXT’s depth migration and tomographic imaging techniques into its workflows, positioning the entity as an industry leader in onshore depth imaging for complex fold- and thrust-belt geologic regimes, as well as pre-salt plays like those found in Kazakhstan and in the onshore basins along the South Atlantic Margin, including those in Angola, Brazil and Gabon.

As our loyal Sweet Spot readers know, NEOS has focused on non-seismic imaging methods since our launch in 2011. What you may not know is that we have long coveted having an in-house seismic capability, and this acquisition now provides us with the ability to offer a true multi-physics imaging solution to our customers.

DR_eye_candy_IL130Though this group – which will be known moving forward as the NEOS Seismic Imaging Group (SIG) – will continue to offer stand-alone data processing and imaging services, we are also excited about how we can extract maximum value for our customers by combining seismic and non-seismic measurements, attributes and methodologies.

One of the first obvious areas we’ll be working on is the incorporation of seismic attributes at the reservoir interval (e.g., rock brittleness, fracture density, fracture orientation) into our Predictive Analytics methods.  But of course there are many others, including the ability to undertake true multi-physics inversions.

Check back over the months ahead to learn more about this addition to the NEOS family.

NEOS Welcomes ION-GXT

An Emerging Hydrocarbon Province – Lebanon (Part 5 of 6)

LBN PlaysNEOS identified four distinct play types in the 6,000 sqkm area assessed on the Lebanon neoBASIN project:

  • A Triassic interval (BLUE) which is geologically similar to the gas and condensate fields of Syria’s Palmyride Belt to the northeast of the survey area;
  • A deeper (and potentially more gas prone) Paleozoic interval (PURPLE) also analogous to the Palmyride fields;
  • A Triassic interval in the near-offshore (BRICK RED) which is likely to be gas prone;
  • A Jurassic interval (YELLOW) which is geologically similar to the oil & gas fields producing south of Lebanon.

The locations on the image above are intentionally disguised in terms of their geo-spatial locations and size (some of the areas shown above are depicted as being smaller compared to those actually assessed as prospective); actual locations of these highgraded play types would, of course, be revealed to licensees of the Lebanon neoBASIN Knowledge Library.

It is interesting to note that the actual interpretation suggests that several areas are prospective for multiple play types, meaning we have ‘stacked plays’ that should reduce the overall exploration risk in these locations given the possibility of multiple targets.

To learn more about this neoBASIN project, visit the Lebanon Global Programs page on the NEOS web site.